What have you done to your wagon lately? (Let's keep the thread going!)

Discussion in 'General Station Wagon Discussions' started by Dogbone, Jul 25, 2011.

  1. 101Volts

    101Volts Well-Known Member

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    The brake hose arrived, and I picked it up.

    If I wake up early enough, I might get a few things done on the car tomorrow.

    EDIT: I replaced the Front Passenger Line between 5 and 6 PM. It's still not fastened to the frame, but it is on.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2020
  2. 101Volts

    101Volts Well-Known Member

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    I installed the Rear Brake Hose to the Differential, took each Drum Brake apart, and replaced the Pistons in each before re-assembly.

    ...

    The first drum brake was the harder of the two, since I had forgotten how to work it.
     
  3. Jairus

    Jairus Well-Known Member

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    You always "go to school" on the first one. The rest are easy after that. :tiphat:
     
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  4. 101Volts

    101Volts Well-Known Member

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    Ya, I don't work on drum brakes every day. I've worked on them before, but it's been 2 years.

    Today, I started installing the Brake Hose on the Rear Differential. One of its brake line screw holes was larger than the other (why?) so I had to go back to AutoZone to buy a size reducer. After that, I installed the lines. I've also put new cheap Brake Fluid in the reservoir, just to suck up moisture in there. I'll remove it before I put Amsoil Brake Fluid in, which has a higher boiling point.

    I've stopped working on the car for the day. Tomorrow, I'm likely to finish up the brake lines, and I'll probably install the tank.

    As it turns out, I need to replace both the Fuel & Vapor Lines at the Front Passenger area; both lines are highly questionable for their structural integrity, and I think they're original to the car.

    Oh, and I should replace the Oil Pan on this car at some point. The original one's seeping oil through microscopic rusty pores in the pan, but it's not a fast leak. That's gonna be a trip and 5/8ths; don't I have to raise the engine to get at the pan on a 1990 Mercury Grand Marquis? It's one of those dual drain plug pans.

    EDIT:

    I should really get to buying new tires for this car sometime, too. The ones on it now are old Dean Alpha 365 Whitewalls, which were a bit smaller in diameter than other 215/70R15s.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2020
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  5. OldFox

    OldFox Curmudgeon

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    I don't think it's a job you can do alone laying on your back. If I recall, you need to get the engine as high as it will go. Drop the pan, then drop the oil pickup into the pan. Start working it out while having someone turn the engine with a breaker bar so each crank lobe clears. Then getting the new one back in without F'ing up the gaskets. They were hard enough to do with the vehicle on a lift. As you said, it's gonna be a trip.
     
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  6. 101Volts

    101Volts Well-Known Member

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    At that rate I might as well get an engine hoist, and go all out with even more repairs; most of those being new gaskets.

    I picked up the last of the fuel line and vent line today, for the spot from the front passenger door to the engine. I was on the fence if I needed these, but it turns out that I do need them; the previous lines are awful rusty in the last 2 feet.

    6 Ft. 1/4 in. Steel Brake Line
    6 Ft. 3/8 in. Steel Brake Line
    2 Ft. 3/8 in. Fuel Line
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2020
  7. 101Volts

    101Volts Well-Known Member

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    2 days later, and I got more done.

    Work Area: From Passenger Front Door Section of Frame to Front of Car

    I removed the original Fuel and Vent lines there, and mostly installed new ones. I'm not quite done yet, but now I have brand new Fuel and Vent line everywhere on the car (except for the frame rail on the driver side, which was replaced by the previous owner.) I'm close to finishing this project, if nothing else pops up.

    I still have to finish the two lines I was just working with, bleed the brakes of air, put the rear wheels back on, re-install the gas tank and lines, etc.
     
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  8. 101Volts

    101Volts Well-Known Member

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    The Fuel Lines and Vapor Line are mostly completed now, except at the Gas Tank, which is half-on now (1 out of 2 straps are installed.) The Tank's propped up by the jack, and I may be nearing the end of these repairs.
     
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  9. Silvertwinkiehobo

    Silvertwinkiehobo "Nothing is foolproof as fools are ingenious."

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    If you can pull the engine to do all work on a stand, you'll actually be miles ahead. I did that on my '79 Ranchero two years ago, and I really thanked myself for doing it that way. I helped my nephew put his replacement 5.0 in his '87 Grand Marquis back in August, and we had that engine on a stand also, because the heads had to be bolted up. Doing that really helped torque the heads.
     
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  10. 101Volts

    101Volts Well-Known Member

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    That's probably what I'll end up doing, if it comes to that.

    As for today, I just learned what I need to do. I had the tank bolted in, but I needed to undo it, because the filler neck needs to be installed first. I made some progress on that, but it's not complete. And yes, I found that this older design requires a block of wood + a hammer to install the filler neck.
     
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  11. OldFox

    OldFox Curmudgeon

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    A little Vaseline on the grommet helps. It won't harm the rubber like grease will.
     
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  12. Silvertwinkiehobo

    Silvertwinkiehobo "Nothing is foolproof as fools are ingenious."

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    I use silicone dielectric grease. It actually conditions the grommet, whereas Vaseline doesn't.
     
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  13. 101Volts

    101Volts Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions. I don't have any Dielectric Grease at the moment, though it shouldn't be hard to pick some up.

    Yesterday:

    1) Secured Tank, and put Filler Neck in. Later, found that the Vent Line was pinched shut.

    2) Flushed the Brake Lines with new Amsoil DOT 3 Brake Fluid, which is a higher quality Brake Fluid that has a higher boiling point.

    Today: I finally got the car running on its own fuel again, but it's still on the stands.

    1) I lowered the tank a bit, re-seated the Vent Line (which was pinched shut) back into its tank clips, then I re-attached the Tank and Filler Neck again.

    2) Removed Car from Wooden Blocks, put on Jack Stands. Changed the Power Steering Fluid (ATF type F.) The old fluid wasn't rancid, but it was oxidized.

    3) Put 2 - 3 Gallons of E0 Gas in, with Methanol added (to get rid of Water, if there is any.)

    4) Re-installed the Battery, which was completely dead. Tried jumping with the Explorer, and it didn't work.

    5) Started charging the battery.

    6) Put more Gas in,. The "Low Fuel Light" shut off.

    7) Removed Rear Air Box Hose to spray Starting Fluid in, because there was no fuel in the lines.

    Eventually, I got the car running on its own fuel. I then tightened 2 Hose Clamps at the Engine.

    Next, tomorrow, I have to:

    1) Top Off the Engine Oil (which is low, it's in the "Add" section of the Dipstick,)

    2) Re-Install the Rear Air Box Hose,

    3) Start the Car and check for fuel leaks (with the garage doors wide open and garage exhaust fan on)

    4) Put the Rear Wheels back on.

    I'm considering also buying a bottle of Amsoil Performance Improver (Injector Cleaner.) I've used it in the Wagon before, but with the old fuel filter, which was dirty.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2020
  14. 101Volts

    101Volts Well-Known Member

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    Today:

    Ran the car with the garage doors open, and with the garage exhaust fan on. Looked for fuel leaks, and found none. However, the Oil Pan Gasket's leaking a drip every 45 seconds or 1 minute. It's not a fast leak. Also, I re-installed the Rear Airbox Hose.

    Tomorrow:

    Since the rear wheels are off, I'll pressure wash both sides of them, and also clean the wheels before re-installing. I'll do this for the front wheels, too, and I might as well rotate the tires. After that, I'll rinse the months of dust off the car and take it for some test drives.

    EDIT: Question: Are the stock wheels on my 1990 Grand Marquis All Aluminum, or are they Steel? I think they're Aluminum, but I'm making sure.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2020
  15. KevinVarnes

    KevinVarnes Well-Known Member

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    '90 GM could come with aluminum or steel wheels with hubcaps. If they are the turbine wheels they are aluminum.
     
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