Is my wagon a wagon?

Discussion in 'General Station Wagon Discussions' started by Poison_Ivy, Sep 22, 2018.

?

Is this a wagon or just a long-roofed something else?

  1. Of course, it's

    4 vote(s)
    16.0%
  2. Definitely not

    5 vote(s)
    20.0%
  3. Not sure

    5 vote(s)
    20.0%
  4. It's a small- bus or van

    7 vote(s)
    28.0%
  5. Other vehicle type

    2 vote(s)
    8.0%
  6. I don't care. It's not mine anyway

    2 vote(s)
    8.0%
  1. Poison_Ivy

    Poison_Ivy Shovelhead

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    Here it is. It wasn't cheap. They go for over 26€, tax inclusive. Which is probably just under $30. I don't know if this is typical modern Jap or exclusive to this particular brand. It almost resembles more an antenna cable than an ignition wire.
    Boxed up in yellow are the terminal ends. Each one is slanted in a way where you can't mount it backwards


    Cap_Wire.jpg

    I hooked it up. But, it still runs rough, as if one of the plugs is wet. It's not belching black smoke. But, rather light colored. It doesen't look like it has a catalytic converter, under there. So, I'll pull the plugs, to see if fouling is at fault. If they're okay, it might be the throttle potentiometer which might have gotten wet from water bouncing off of the firewall

    Potentiometer.jpg
     
  2. Poison_Ivy

    Poison_Ivy Shovelhead

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    That was plenty of fuss over nothing. I started it up, yesterday, and got a whiff of rich mixture. But, no raw fuel was to be noticed. So, I pulled the plugs and each one was what looks like oil/fuel wet. I then was curious as to how it would run with the new plugs I had sent weeks ago. In fact, months, by now. It then started up, like nothing ever happened in between. The amount of rust on the most outward plug hints on these plugs being original to the car. Incidently, the new plugs were already gapped to my engine's specs. I'm going to try getting a better snapshot of the electrodes, later on

    Kerzen.jpg
     
  3. Poison_Ivy

    Poison_Ivy Shovelhead

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    After having changed the oil and driving it around, I noticed now where the oil leak's coming from. It's seeping out of the head gasket. So, it looks like I'll have to pull the head and have it measured against a straight edge. Because the previous owner would get in the car and drive it immediately, revving the motor to high r.p.m.s, before shifting, all this on a cold engine, even in Winter, it's no wonder that the head gasket between differing metals would eventually fail.
    Even more alarming is the reason as to why the sparkplugs were fouling. While driving with the old oil, the plugs would stay clean. In the Daihatsu forum where I'm a member, they would often mention that the later model engines were fickle, as to the type of oil to be used. Nothing was mentioned about my older design, except that it's virtually indestructable. I don't know what the previous owner had in there. But, I poured in 15W-40 and now it smokes. Especially, after downhill engine braking. The fouling is progressive, being worse in the cylinder which is furthest away from the external leak and cleanest in the cylinder next to the leak.
    Now, I can first assume that vacuum is sucking oil through a blown gasket. However, the thinner oil might be revealing weak points in the valve seals or varnished rings. Being that blown head gaskets are often the result of overheating, if the gasket was blown because of this, the valve seals would bake to a crisp. I guess, I could be assured that this wasn't the case. Otherwise, I'd be noticing rust water stains around the cap. But, you never know. For right now, I'll go with the gasket theory, otherwise the fouling would be evenly distributed to all cylinders, if the gasket wasn't at fault. I just would hate to only deal with the gasket and then have the fouling re-occur.
    For the first time under my ownership, the engine wouldn't take full thottle, just before I got home. I'm assuming that the burnt oil might have covered my Lambda-Sonde sensor

    Kopfdichtung_Hinüber.jpg



     
  4. Silvertwinkiehobo

    Silvertwinkiehobo "Nothing is foolproof as fools are ingenious."

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    That sounds exactly right. Fouling that sensor (also known by the name of oxygen sensor here in the U.S.) with anything will stop it from working. I wanted to point something out, concerning your engine. Fouling is from two possible sources: the head gasket, and the rings. I think you need to perform three tests on the cylinders, so that you have a better picture of the engine's condition: a dry compression test, a wet compression test and a compression leakdown test. The first two will tell you if there is uneven compression between the cylinders, and if the rings are part of that lost compression; The third will tell you if you have worn valves or compression escape into the cooling system. This way, if you have more problems than just oil consumption, you can decide if you want to replace or rebuild the entire engine, rather than just repairing one or two problems.
     
  5. Poison_Ivy

    Poison_Ivy Shovelhead

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    Okay, oxygen sensor is the word I wanted to use. But, forgot already. Yeah, it's leading to that, since it won't run right, even after taking the propane torch to each plug for drying them out. However, I might have damaged the plugs, through heating them up like that. Because these are modern oddball resistor types. Vintage plugs could take punishment.
    Not long after, the second series of this model showed up with an entirely new engine which was known for having oiling problems at the rings, if the wrong oil was used, over a longer period of time or if the oil wasn't changed frequently enough. The drainage holes in the pistons were drilled too small and therefore both rings and pistons would varnish up, to the point where the rings couldn't expand to the wall for sealing. Which also caused excessive oil consumption. These problems were not known to have affected the older design I'm using. But, since the previous owner did a good job of neglect, I can't rule this out, either. However, before I used 15W-40, which isn't listed in the handbook, the engine ran perfectly clean, aside from that external leak pictured. The handbook, however, allows even thinner oil, such as 10W-30 for temperatures not falling below 0°F and even the thinner 5W-30 for Arctic temperaures. From that standpoint, I've only a sample of the oil drained. If I could find a laboratory equipped to analyze it, they should be able to determine the viscosity range and any additives which might be in there, since concoctions are available which act like Bar's Leak, to seal sloppy engines.
    Concerning compression, when the engine runs right, it runs even and absolutely no power loss is evident. Under normal use, premature failure causing compression loss is unknown, at that milage. The quality of materials assures that under proper conditions, these engines will do 400,000 Kilometers or more, before a teardown is necessary. In any case, if I had a compression tester, I'd certainly use it. I don't know what happened to the one I used to have. I think, it was one of the ill-fated tools which I left at my inlaw's house, way back then.
    Here's where the external leak is located. Which is where the oil drainage got cast. Since there's virtually no pressure there, except for maybe minor blow-by, that's quite a dramatic leak.
    Now that I just copied an image of the block, the leak might be originating from the oil gallery of which I suspect doubles as a headbolt hole. The clue lies at the gasket, where they run a bead of blue around that particular bolt cut-out and the drainage port:


    Head.jpg
    Gasket.jpg Block.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2019
  6. Silvertwinkiehobo

    Silvertwinkiehobo "Nothing is foolproof as fools are ingenious."

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    If that is the case, that the pressurized oil comes up right next to the drainback, and the pressurized oil leaks into the drainback, it could possibly hold up oil drainage as well as allow oil to push it's way out from crankcase pressure. As a temporary fix, if you clean that corner carefully and completely with brake cleaner, inside and out (meaning you'll need to remove the valve cover to access the inside of the drainback, then, like cleaning a rifle barrel, clean the drainback where the head and block meet. You then clean the outside and between the head and block the best you can, so that you can force black silicone between them from the outside. I've done this on oil pans and OHV heads before, as a temporary oil leak fix, and have had pretty good success with it. The keys are cleanliness and curing time. Of course, if you do this, we'd like to know how it turns out.
     
  7. Silvertwinkiehobo

    Silvertwinkiehobo "Nothing is foolproof as fools are ingenious."

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    If you do elect to replace the gasket, then, of course, the flatness of the head milling is the most important part. The spec should be .1525 mm maximum warpage over 150 mm with the straightedge crosswise both ways on the head. The lower the first number, the less that is required to be milled to flatten the head. Then, head bolt holes cleanliness and cleaned bolt threads. According to a Daihatsu owner's forum, there is no indication that the head bolts are torque-to-yield, requiring measurement of bolt length or replacement.
     
  8. Poison_Ivy

    Poison_Ivy Shovelhead

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    You mean, they're not the stretch bolt types of which you can only use once?
    I can live with the leak, meaning that I could seal it with that black silicone. But, the plug-fouling is a must-go. What I was thinking is the possibility that an internal leak back into the drain could lower oil volume needed for adequately supplying the drivetrain. Right now, when I remove the cap for dumping in more oil, the one rockershaft sitting under the cap looks dry, as if oil isn't getting up there. Gunked up as it was, as I was adjusting the valves last autumn, I wouldn't rule out the possibility of a plugged passage forcing oil to travel between the gasket and metal.
    If this car had a catylitic converter, I would suppose that the only way to tell if it's an oil burner is through not only consumption. But, also the carboning up of the oxygen sensor, resulting in extreme power-loss on fuel-injected engines, since the converter would burn up the smoke to the point where you wouldn't smell it. If it went on too long, I'd imagine that the converter would eventually get plugged.
    I've got oil residue, in the air cleaner. A certain amount should be normal, as moisture finds its way out of oil, though reaching operating temperature. However, excessive amounts could mean excessive blow-by

    Blowby.jpg
     
  9. Silvertwinkiehobo

    Silvertwinkiehobo "Nothing is foolproof as fools are ingenious."

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    You also have to consider the PCV for ventilating the crankcase, as when it plugs, the CC pressure forces oil out of leak points, and backward through the CC fresh air intake. Some cars use a separate filter in the air cleaner (carburetor) or air box (EFI), some use the main filtered air, and the sign of a bad PCV or plugged PCV vacuum passage is the oil in the CC breather, the main air filter or the air tube to the throttle body.
     
  10. Poison_Ivy

    Poison_Ivy Shovelhead

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    I went to a former Daihatsu dealer, yesterday, where I already ordered a couple parts. I asked if the headlights were still available for mine. After having looked them up at his source, he said that they no longer are. But, will try his back-up source. I told him not to go through the trouble, since the next inspection isn't due until February of 2021. I then explained the oil-burning occuring after changing the oil. He said that the rings are varnished. I replied that I only new of this happening on vehicles using the newer engine design and he said that it also happens on these. I'm assuming that on the engine series produced for mine, it simply took longer for the rings to fail, because of neglect. I can't be sure that something wasn't lost in the communication. But, in any event, I'll pull the valve cover, to see if fresh oil is getting to the drivetrain. If puddles of old oil are seen, I can then rule out the valve seals being at fault. I suppose, if oil isn't reaching the valvetrain, I could also rule out any lubrication reaching the valve stems which would be much worse, since the seals can be chnages without even removing the head.
    If there's fresh oil puddling up there, I'll try changing the oil to the thickest recommended type, like was suggested in a Daihatsu forum. If that stops the burning, I'll leave the rest alone, except for the head gasket change, and hope that detergents will do their job. I would prefer using heavilly-detergented oil formulated for Diesel trucks. But, have no idea as to its compatibility with every engine seal.
    If oil is indeed flowing to the valve train and the engine still smokes after having poured in the proper oil, I'll order a complete gasket set and then proceed to remove each piston for devarnishing
     
  11. Poison_Ivy

    Poison_Ivy Shovelhead

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    I pulled the oxygen sensor and it seemed not to have taken the brunt of the fouling. It looks like the heat generated through further combustion has atomized escaping oil. I had to cut the sheetmetal shield of which they bolted onto the manifold, since the bolt heads are rusting away and they're frozen in, in order to be able to get a wrench on the sensor. I'm dealing with an eventual apartment eviction, at the moment. If I ever get into a position to where I can change this gasket without some sword hanging over my head, I'll also replace these bolts with studs and bronze nuts. I simply took a copper-wired brush, to the sensor, and applied some of that copper grease used primarily for brake parts onto the threads and then screwed it back in. I also replaced the fouled plugs with ones I had around which weren't specified for the vehicle. It then started up and ran as if nothing ever happened. It still burns oil. But, I won't know how much it will burn, until I take it on a long run. If the additives are loosening up ring varnish, I need not bother changing to a heavier oil

    Lambda.jpg
     

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