Is my wagon a wagon?

Discussion in 'General Station Wagon Discussions' started by Poison_Ivy, Sep 22, 2018.

?

Is this a wagon or just a long-roofed something else?

  1. Of course, it's

    5 vote(s)
    17.2%
  2. Definitely not

    6 vote(s)
    20.7%
  3. Not sure

    5 vote(s)
    17.2%
  4. It's a small- bus or van

    9 vote(s)
    31.0%
  5. Other vehicle type

    2 vote(s)
    6.9%
  6. I don't care. It's not mine anyway

    2 vote(s)
    6.9%
  1. Doghead

    Doghead Well-Known Member

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    The factory calls for between 0.020 - 0.044 mm. Since I was measuring from underneath, it wasn't easy trying to bend the scale, in order to circumvent each crank throw. The scales were shown in increments of 0.025-, 0.038-, 0.05 etc... mm each

    PG_Kolbenschmidt.jpg

    To my best estimate, given poor lighting conditions, I've gotten the following readings, starting from worst to best, with swapped shells on each throw:

    1. 0.038 mm
    2. >0.025 - <0.038 mm
    3. 0.025 mm
    The best throw doesen't look like it would need any emery treatment. As far as the other two are concerned, I can be a little more generous with the middle throw. But, must watch it with the first one. In which case, I'll only use enough emery that will smoothen out any unseen-through-naked-eye rough edges. Before I might go too far, I'll plastigage that particular throw, once more.
    In any event, this is nothing, compared to a newly monumental Fluster Cuck authored by E-Bay of whom, like Amazon, seem to have outgrown their already over-inflated egos. As I went about trying to order the bearing set, there was no option for paying for the order in advance. Either you do it through PayPal or you have to use a credit card. It used to be that you could e-mail e-Bay and get instructions on how to. Since this bearing set isn't currently available in Germany, as far as I know, I had to order it from Great Britain, despite the online shop being physically located in Bulgaria which usually accepts payment in EUROs. The shop itself also makes it impossible to e-mail them. All that's available is a telephone number. I could possibly get the payment in advance bank data through SMS. But, for me, that seems a little too shady, without the usual E-Bay money back guarantee:

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/CON-ROD-ENGINE-BEARING-SET-STD-DAIHATSU-MIRA-CUORE-HI-JET-850-ED10-TAIHO-JAPAN/113718966476?fits=Car+Make:Daihatsu|Model:Move|Cars+Type:0.8|Plat_Gen:L6_|Cars+Year:1998&hash=item1a7a2db8cc:g:fAoAAOSw~y9ZAdL7

    [​IMG]

    The compressed width of those wax stripes could be misleading, since the plastigage wax will compress into the caused by damage grooves. In this case, without a precision micrometer, the true journal diameter cannot be accurately determined enough to judge if flat-grinding the journal to below the groove's depth will superceed specifications allowing standard-sized bearingshell replacement or not. Therefore, the actual distance between the outer surface of the journal in question and the bearing surface itself will be less than the plastigage will reveal. So, if the reading taken being 0.038 would be adjusted for wax seeping into the grooves, the actual distance between the bearing shell and the outer edge of the journal itself might be only 0.035 or less, taking a wild guess. In that case, applying emery would only affect that outter surface, sanding it back down to a 0.038 micrometer reading, if only the outter journal surface were to get measured.
    In a worse case scenario where absolutely no standard bearings were available and no shop is available for re-babbiting the original shells, what I could do is to install the best shells swapped from the rods to the caps onto the worse journal and vice versa. This would give me less clearance on the most damaged journal, while giving me more on the undamaged one, while still being within reasonable specs on all three. In turn, either the knock will temporarilly end or there could be more than one lighter knocks which would buy time. Running it on the heaviest recommended oil, in that case, could put a buffer between the groove's void and the bearing shell. Driving the vehicle lightly could prolong service, until I could get into a comfortable situation for doing everything right
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2020
  2. Doghead

    Doghead Well-Known Member

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    I found the company's e-mail adress, yesterday, and they wrote back with necessary bank data. They only want 20€ for the set and 5€ postage. So, I'm wiring them their money, later on. They've got a good Ebay rating. So, I'm going for it.
    Here's what the middle one looks like:


    Lager_2.jpg
     
  3. Doghead

    Doghead Well-Known Member

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    I just got wise to a site which offers almost anything for all automatic transmissions. They're usefull for identifying all U.S. automatics, because they show detailed images of all pan types:

    https://www.fatsco.net/pan-gasket-id


    I was trying to look up both import brands which might have had my pan gasket, to no avail. However, the rebuild kits on a couple of them might, for the most part, work. I could go ahead and try getting that Permatex goop:

    https://www.permatex.com/products/g...atex-automatic-transmission-rtv-gasket-maker/

    [​IMG]

    I'm however, apprehensive about gluing the pan on, because the engine's oilpan was glued on at the factory. But, the shop manual calls for using a gasket for panning the transmission, instead. I can always get a sheet of cork, if it comes down to it

    Wanne_AT.jpg
     
  4. Silvertwinkiehobo

    Silvertwinkiehobo "Nothing is foolproof as fools are ingenious."

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    That would be the way to go. Just get a hole punch for the bolt holes, same style as leather hole punches, but depending on the bolt diameter, you get one that cuts a 5 or 6mm hole.
     
  5. Doghead

    Doghead Well-Known Member

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    I've got one of those leather-punch pliers. I'm just not sure what to order. They've got this in 1.5 and 2 mm.
    I'll wait until I get it running. It's not urgent. The tensioner's ordered locally and it'll take between 2 and 2 1/2 weeks to show up. I'll bring the pan in, when the tensioner's there. If he can't match it up with an on the shelf gasket, I'll ask if he's got the cork sheets.
    In the mean time, I can run the engine with the old tensioner
     
  6. Doghead

    Doghead Well-Known Member

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    I pulled the drums today, only to discover even more Three Stoogery. The cylinders were evidently replaced, at such low milage. Either this was unnecessary work, in order to milk the old lady who religiously took her car to dealer inspections, or they didn't bother bleeding the system at recommended intervals. At only around 60.000 miles, even if a couple of intervals were missed, they still could have rebuilt the cylinders. The ones on there neither look Japanese nor First World. This three-circled symbol also looks unfamiliar, as does the barrel measurement given in inches. I removed the cups only to see plenty of fluid pouring out of both cylinders. The finish on the barrel casting and softness of the cap rubber are dead ringers for new replacements. In which case, I'm not even bothering with rebuilding them. Instead, I'll order quality items.
    On the other hand, the shoes are quality A.T.E.s. I've sprayed them with brake cleaner and will keep them in service.
    Some Cabbage Head decided to remove the nut without bothering to remove the cotter pin. Thus, ruining the spindle's thread


    Brems_ATE.jpg
     
  7. Silvertwinkiehobo

    Silvertwinkiehobo "Nothing is foolproof as fools are ingenious."

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    You might be able to recut the threads. Is there a tool rental place you can go to? I'm trying to remember, but it seems those small car spindles are an M14 or M15-2.0mm? Something like that, because sourcing a replacement spindle might be too expensive, if not doable. As for the wheel cylinders, I'm surprised they were able to fit anything that wasn't made specifically for it.
     
  8. Doghead

    Doghead Well-Known Member

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    Anyone can fly to China with a part they want duplicated. There are no formalities about it. They'll take you immediately to the shop floor, measure the item and give you a price on a batch of them. All without formal introductions and the usual cordial butt-kissing.
    I turned the castlenut backwards, after removing as many shavings from the threads as possible and then screwed it onto the spindle with the threads oiled. It cleaned up the threads a little. I'll then use the undamaged castlenut from the other side and torque it to specs. It should hold, since most of the damage is located around where the cotter pin belongs.
    Yeah, it uses 14 mm threads. I think, a 1,25 mm pitch. I'll make it a point to measure it, once the new parts are in. The spindels are one of the few items which aren't a pain to remove. If the studs are pressed in, I might end up having to heat up the surroundings, though.
    At the Daihatsu forum, a member told me that once the shoes get wet, they're junk. That would be the first time I've ever replaced shoes because of that. Would steam drive out the brake fluid from the shoes?
    As I was looking up parts, I ran into this blog featuring my vehicle with the turbocharger option. The one below appears to be Maylasian-built versions of th eabove, after the Japanese version went out of production, upon introduction of the second series:

    https://www.google.nl/search?source...ZIBAzIuOJgBAKABAaoBB2d3cy13aXo&sclient=psy-ab




    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2020 at 1:52 AM

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