What causes the milky look on vinyl woodgrain?

Discussion in 'Woodgrain' started by patrick80, Nov 23, 2015.

  1. patrick80

    patrick80 My big woodie!

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    IMG_1017.JPG IMG_1019.JPG Got this happening in two places on my '86 Country Squire - around the gas filler and near the tailgate. Ideas?
     
  2. ModelT1

    ModelT1 Lost in the 50's

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    After much consideration and debate, from my long experience with wood grain my answer is....................................... :huh:


    And I'm happier than you are!:bananaman::biglaugh:
     
  3. OldFox

    OldFox Curmudgeon

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    It's called oxidation
     
  4. patrick80

    patrick80 My big woodie!

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    OK, so how does one get rid of the oxidation???
     
  5. Vista

    Vista Well-Known Member

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    I believe they used a clear outer film on the woodgrain vinyl. Given that it is appearing around the fuel door, I'd say the gasoline has something to do with the milkiness. Either some solvent has been absorbed or some plasticizer has been leached out. You might try warming a test area with a hair drier to drive off any volatiles, BUT NOT IF THERE ARE ANY GAS FUMES! No point in burning down your wagon and garage.
     
  6. Steve-E-D

    Steve-E-D Well-Known Member

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    I am seeing something like this, much worse on my wagon. It appears to be oxidation from the trim strip above the woodgrain running down across the surface.
     
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  7. ModelT1

    ModelT1 Lost in the 50's

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    That's most likely one of the problems. Also the sun in many areas, the fuel, age, and global warming.
     
  8. patrick80

    patrick80 My big woodie!

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    I can buy all that but the Gorebal Warming hooie.
     
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  9. patrick80

    patrick80 My big woodie!

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    Don't think it is gas, as I have the very same thing happening on the RF fender.
     
  10. ModelT1

    ModelT1 Lost in the 50's

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    Would some sort of wax or cleaner help darken it up?
     
  11. n2fordmuscle

    n2fordmuscle Well-Known Member

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    Just curious, is this original vinyl woodgrain, or reproduction/replacement? If replacement, how long has it been on there?
     
  12. OldFox

    OldFox Curmudgeon

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    Once it gets to that point, it's too late. When paint oxidizes, you can wet sand it and buff it because it has film thickness and the film is consistent throughout. Vinyl outgasses its volatiles and starts to deteriorate. The sun and elements start to act on it. While your paint has numerous coats, your vinyl is only 1 coat thick. Probably the best you can do is to buff it with a lamb's wool buffer and fine polishing compound and then protect it with Amour All or one of those coatings they advertise on TV that brings back the color to oxidized plastics.
     

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